Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/12281
Title: A critical analysis of the Legal Frame Work on Forensic Autopsies in Uganda.
Authors: Asiimwe, Joshua
Keywords: Legal Frame Work
Legal Frame Work
Forensic Autopsies
Forensic Autopsies
Critical Analysis
Critical Analysis
Uganda
Uganda
Issue Date: May-2015
Publisher: Kampala International University, School of law.
Abstract: This research is investigates the existence of a legal status on human tissues and whether the law is still evolving. The question of whether a human tissue deserves protection or what legal category underpins that protection often depends on one or more paradigms generally applied towards the analysis of human tissues. Accordingly, the research sets out to identify and explore the international concept and principles on forensic autopsy usually animate the analysis of human tissues. It suggests a trend towards a more inclusive use of all analytical models, in contrast to the monolithic approach inspired by the no-property rule. This research utilized secondary data, this is to say information from articles, journals, reviewed literature and Ugandan legislation all related to forensic autopsy. Forensic autopsy in Uganda appears to be a forgotten case since the act has never been updated for over 8 decades and there are currently no any other act or rule governing forensic autopsy. This research therefore investigated the meaning, purpose and concepts concerning forensic autopsy in Uganda and then further went ahead to investigate on the Ugandan legislation in matters of forensic autopsy such as the constitution of 1995 and the Inquest Act. The research sought more information even on the international code of conduct and how other countries have managed to oversee the duties of a pathologist. In conclusion therefore, the Ugandan government needs further examination and implementation of the forensic autopsy laws and this could help overcome errors that have been experienced in the past years.
This research is investigates the existence of a legal status on human tissues and whether the law is still evolving. The question of whether a human tissue deserves protection or what legal category underpins that protection often depends on one or more paradigms generally applied towards the analysis of human tissues. Accordingly, the research sets out to identify and explore the international concept and principles on forensic autopsy usually animate the analysis of human tissues. It suggests a trend towards a more inclusive use of all analytical models, in contrast to the monolithic approach inspired by the no-property rule. This research utilized secondary data, this is to say information from articles, journals, reviewed literature and Ugandan legislation all related to forensic autopsy. Forensic autopsy in Uganda appears to be a forgotten case since the act has never been updated for over 8 decades and there are currently no any other act or rule governing forensic autopsy. This research therefore investigated the meaning, purpose and concepts concerning forensic autopsy in Uganda and then further went ahead to investigate on the Ugandan legislation in matters of forensic autopsy such as the constitution of 1995 and the Inquest Act. The research sought more information even on the international code of conduct and how other countries have managed to oversee the duties of a pathologist. In conclusion therefore, the Ugandan government needs further examination and implementation of the forensic autopsy laws and this could help overcome errors that have been experienced in the past years.
Description: A research report Submitted to the School of Law in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Award of the Degree of Bachelor in Laws of Kampala International University.
A research report Submitted to the School of Law in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Award of the Degree of Bachelor in Laws of Kampala International University.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/12281
Appears in Collections:Bachelor of Laws

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