Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/4288
Title: Prevalence and factors associated with malaria among children less than five years attending Fort Portal Regional Referral Hospital
Authors: Byamukama, Atanazio
Keywords: Malaria
Children
Fort Portal Regional Referral Hospital
Issue Date: Oct-2019
Publisher: Kampala International University, School of Health Sciences
Abstract: The study assessed the prevalence of malaria among children less than 5 years who attended Fort Portal Regional Referral Hospital (FPRRH) from July 2018 to July 2019. A cross sectional retrospective and a qualitative analytical survey using questionnaires were used in the study among <5 children attending OPD at FPRRH (Buhinga) Kabarole district from period of 12 months- July 2018 to July 2019; based on Kish and Lashie-1965, 112 respondents were simply and randomly sampled. The data was coded and entered into SPSS for analysis and results were presented in frequencies and percentages using tables and pie charts. Of the 112 children assessed, malaria cases were 41 (36.6%) and 71 (63.4%) were normal, 4-5years were 21 (51.2%) followed by 2-3 years 29.3% (12) and the lowest was < 2 years with 19.5% (08). Mosquito nets use stands at 75.9% (85) and 24.1% (27) do not. Children who were living in the rural areas were 87.5% (98) and 24.1% (27).in urban areas. Houses with earthed floors were more than a half 58.0% (65), followed by sand floor houses with 19.6% (22), then brick floor houses with 10.8% (12), cement floor houses had 09 (8.0%) and finally tile floor houses had 3.6% (04). Whereas Mud wall houses stands at 60.7% (68), sand wall houses at 25.0% (28), brick wall houses with 8.9% (10) and cemented walls were 5.4% (06). The prevalence of malaria among <5 children at Fort Portal Regional Referral (Buhinga) Hospital was low (36.6%); majorly influenced by the high level of utilization of ITNs but negatively affected by area of residence (Rural), Nature of the floor (Earthed floor and mud walls) makes malaria persistent thus a need to address the matter.
Description: A research report submitted to the Faculty of Clinical Medicine and Dentistry in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of a degree of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery of Kampala International University
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/4288
Appears in Collections:Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery(MBchB)

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