Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/4429
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorModo , Martin Eric-
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-23T17:12:51Z-
dc.date.available2019-11-23T17:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2018-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/4429-
dc.descriptionA Research Report Submitted to Uganda Nurses And Midwives Examination Board In Partial Fulfillment Of The Requirements for The Award Of A diploma In Nursing.en_US
dc.description.abstractDespite all efforts to improve child survival, through growth monitoring-promotion, by Government , health worker efforts and non-governmental organizations, the unmet need for continued GM still remained a challenge at 45% nationally in Uganda,Regionally in Karamoja north eastern Uganda the gap was even alarming at 63%, 66% in Moroto district and was estimated at 69.9% in the selected study village of Katanga. The purpose of the study was to determine the factors affecting the continued GM among children 10-23 months old at Katanga village Moroto Municipality. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study design, in which both qualitative and quantitative methods were applied due to their rapidity, cost effectiveness and ability to obtain data in depth among 40 respondents. The study found out that 21(52.5%) of the children in the study had been attending growth monitoring promotion while 19(47.5%) had not been. Married mothers were 25(62.5%) and were more likely to take children for GMP. Less than average 16(40%) of mothers were knowledgeable and understood the importance of continued GM, slightly more than half 22(55%) understood the information displayed on the child health card. Half of the health workers 21(52.5%) were committed and 23 (57.5%) of the respondents reported availability of health facilities beyond 5 km return journey and majorly affected the continued GM of children 10-14 months of age. In conclusion: Mothers with lower education levels, those who did not know the health benefits of GM, and those with less knowledge about information displayed on the child health card, were less likely to continue with growth monitoring promotion program. Additionally, long distance to the health facility also greatly contributed to low utilization of growth monitoring promotion program among children 10-23 months of age.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKampala International University, School of Health Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectFactors Affecting the Continuation of Growthen_US
dc.subjectGrowth Monitoring-Promotionen_US
dc.subjectChildren 10-23 Months,en_US
dc.subjectKatanga Village, Moroto Municipality.en_US
dc.titleFactors Affecting the Continuation of Growth Monitoring-Promotion Among Children 10-23 Months, Katanga Village Moroto Municipality.en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
Appears in Collections:Diploma in Nursing Sciences(Extension) DNS

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Modo_Martin_Eric.pdfFull text1.3 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.