Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/6126
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dc.contributor.authorEwangu, Charles-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-02T11:57:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-02T11:57:01Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/6126-
dc.descriptionA Research Report Submitted to the College of Economics and Management in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Award of the Degree of Economics and Applied Statistics of Kampala International Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a significant difference between social stratification on pupil’s access to education in Bunga Primary School in Makindye Division Kampala District. It was guided by three objectives: to identify social stratification in terms of gender, age, pupil’s residence, religion and number of children from home at Bunga Primary School in Makindye Division Kampala District, to assess the level of access to primary education in Bunga Primary School in Makindye Division Kampala District and to determine whether there is are significant differences between the level of social stratification and access to primary education in Bunga Primary School in Makindye Division Kampala District. The study applied only quantitative research approach mainly descriptive correlations design. The target population was pupils from a primary school. A sample of 86 pupils from ~primary six and primary seven was chosen based on simple random sampling to be part of the study. Data were collected using both self-administered questionnaires and analyzed by use of means, standard deviations, Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis- test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The study sought to test the null hypothesis of the study which holds that there is no significant difference between the level of social stratification and pupil’s access to education. The study found out that: gender, age religion, pupil’s residence from school and number of children from home are statistically insignificant. The findings have indicated that Access to primary Education in the selected school that participated in the study was moderate. The study also found out that there is no significant difference between social satisfaction and pupil’s access to primary education at 0.05 level of significance. In conclusion, findings have disproved the null hypothesis by highlighting that indeed there is a significant difference between the level of social stratification and pupil’s access to education. The researcher concluded that there is need for the government to empower the local communities in the district so that they can climb up the social ladder and have better access to education. This can be by targeting the marginalized social groups like girls, and the disabled as well as the low income earners. The parents and guardians of pupils need to be sensitized on the importance of education which in turn will improve their social status. They need to take advantage of the Universal primary Education program and invest in the social improvement of their children. Sensitization can be done through having regular community meetings and door-to-door campaigns about the importance of educating children and taking advantage of existing government programs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherKampala International University, College of Economics and Managementen_US
dc.subjectSocial stratificationen_US
dc.subjectPrimary education in Ugandaen_US
dc.subjectBunga primary schoolen_US
dc.subjectMakindye division Kampala districten_US
dc.titleSocial stratification and access to primary education in Uganda:en_US
dc.title.alternativea case study of Bunga primary school Makindye division Kampala districten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Appears in Collections:Bachelors Degree in Economics

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