Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/1579
Title: Community Education Challenges in Young Adults of South Western Uganda
Authors: Kasozi, Keneth Iceland
Echoru, Isaac
Mbiydzenyuy, Elvis Ngala
Kimwise, Aaron
Nansunga, Miriam
Semuyaba, Ibrahim
Kalange, Muhamudu
Ninsiima, Herbert Izo
Muggaga, Kintu
Emorut, Simon Peter
Keywords: Community Education in Uganda
Uganda
Children Education in Sub-Saharan Uganda
Medical Students Rural Education,
Rural Public Health
Issue Date: Feb-2015
Publisher: Scientific Research Publishing Inc.
Citation: Kasozi, K.I., Echoru, I., Mbiydzenyuy, E.N., Kimwise, A., Nansunga, M., Semuyaba, I., Kalange, M., Ninsiima, H.I., Muggaga, K. and Emorut, S.P. (2015) Community Education Challenges in Young Adults of South Western Uganda. Open Journal of Epidemiology, 5, 65-70. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojepi.2015.51009
Series/Report no.: Open Journal of Epidemiology;vol.5, 65-70
Abstract: The aim of this study was to identify the major challenges to community education and any health problem in Bushenyi district of South Western Uganda. Data collection was done through questionnaire and participants were randomly selected. This was a cross-sectional study carried out for a period of three months in 2012. A questionnaire was used to collect data and using onsite observations the responses were validated. A total of 260 participants from 65 homesteads were included in the study from 52 households. 144 were females and 116 males, of which 52.4% of the children were female and the rest male. The mean ± SEM age of females and males was 36 ± 8.6 and 29 ± 8.6 years respectively. In all the homesteads, 71% were headed by an adult male and only 29% were found to be headed by an adult female while none was headed by children. Inferential analysis showed (P = 0.02) that there are more females than male in the homesteads. Majority of the homesteads are being taken care of by women instead of men probably as a result of the high mortalities due to HIV/AIDS in the past decade and above all the movement of most men to urban centers in search of better sources of employment to support their families. Among school going age participant’s i.e. children and adolescents, only 59.6% were found to be attending school. There was no statistical significance (P = 0.16) between school attendance and age. Family responsibilities such as cooking for younger siblings by female participants, obligations on open market days are thought to be secondary limiting factors for community development and livelihood among young persons; thus a follow up study would be conducted to assess their associations in this community as this would raise major child abuse concerns which would need to be reported to the legal authorities for follow up.
Description: The article is available full text.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/1579
Appears in Collections:Department of Physiology

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